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Occupational Assessment Of Ocular Safety Hazards Of Small Business Auto-Mechanic Shops.

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dc.contributor.author Shaba, Jennifer Jane
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-13T14:25:45Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-13T14:25:45Z
dc.date.issued 2009-05-01
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2323/3979
dc.description This paper is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Optometry. 30 pages. en_US
dc.description.abstract Purpose: An occupational assessment was conducted to evaluate ocular safety controls in small business auto-mechanic shops and the specific chemicals used in these environments. Compiled data was analyzed and distributed for optometrist to be knowledgeable with the specific chemicals that pose an ocular threat to the eye and comfortably recommending the proper ocular safety devices. Methods: Five worksites of small automotive and mechanical businesses were evaluated by walk through site observation throughout the Detroit Metropolitan area. This study was limited to only quick oil change, general auto-mechanics and small business care dealerships. Evaluation of employee work environment and safety controls were compiled for analysis against OSHA guidelines in regards to how the facilities maintained a safe and healthy ocular environment. Approximately 20 Interviews were conducted with employers and their employees to understand the implementation and enforcement of safety eye wear. Each individual who participated signed a consent form which was approved by the Ferris State University human subjects review committee. This study presents different types, amount, causes and cost incurred of eye injuries over a five year period. Results: One out of five sites presented with a decent eye wash station. Fortunately during a five year period only two out of five places actually sought a professional eye care provider due to an eye injury. None of the auto mechanic shops had a formal education on ocular hazards, but enforcement of eye protection around specific machinery was implemented. This awareness lessened the chances of ocular injury. Fortunately, the same chemicals were found in each facility with greater emphasis on systemic versus ocular hazards. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries UA 29;
dc.subject Buckingham, Robert. Faculty advisor. en_US
dc.title Occupational Assessment Of Ocular Safety Hazards Of Small Business Auto-Mechanic Shops. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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