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The Millenial's Opinion Of Online Glasses Prescription

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dc.contributor.author Gryson, Stacey
dc.contributor.author Spooner, Casey
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-15T01:25:49Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-15T01:25:49Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05-01
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2323/6091
dc.description This paper is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Optometry. 29 pages. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from a pdf version of a thesis. en_US
dc.description.abstract Background: The topic of online refractions and eyewear purchasing is quickly becoming a topic of concern within the field of optometry. Our goal through this project is to assess the opinions of millennials aged 18-34 regarding the safety, efficacy, and convenience of the concept of online eyecare. Methods: The study was conducted through an online survey through Survey Monkey shared through the social media network of Facebook. The age range is individuals aged eighteen through thirty-four-years-old. The sample size is 189 opinions. Results: Of the 189 respondents, 71.8% were female. Over 86% of participants reported that they had had a full eye exam, but only 53.2% said that a full exam entailed both a refraction and dilation. About 90% of opinions agreed that they need to go to an optometrist or ophthalmologist for a full exam, but only 64.4% agreed that they needed to be dilated to fully assess ocular health. About 98% of respondents agreed that systemic health and medications can affect ocular health, 90% felt changes related to diabetes and 97% felt changes related to hypertension could cause changes to the eye. About 94% of millenials agreed that it was important for contact lenses to be evaluated for fit by an eye care professional. Consistently about 80-90% of people felt online eye exams would not assess them for eye diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, binocular vision dysfunction, or macular degeneration. About 95% of participants felt an eyeglass prescription obtained online would be less accurate that one from an eye care professional. Conclusions: It is valuable to eye care professionals to know the opinions of their patients, especially in this technology-savy age group. This survey provides valuable information about which topics may require some increased public education. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries UA 29;
dc.subject Dinardo, Amy. O.D. Faculty advisor. en_US
dc.subject Online patient exams. en_US
dc.subject Optometry practice management. en_US
dc.title The Millenial's Opinion Of Online Glasses Prescription en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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